UM-Flint School of Nursing Announces Major Program Expansion

Share or print this article
UM-Flint School of Nursing simulation lab
UM-Flint School of Nursing simulation lab

The School of Nursing at the University of Michigan-Flint is slated for a major expansion to its pre-licensure undergraduate nursing programs, which will pave the way for more students, faculty, and community contributions.

“We are extremely excited that the School of Nursing received approval from the Michigan Board of Nursing to increase the number of students in our pre-licensure Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) programs from 120 to 176 starting in January 2018,” said Margaret Andrews, Interim Dean of the School of Nursing.

“The majority of UM-Flint nursing graduates remain in Genesee County where they contribute significantly to the nursing workforce and make valuable contributions to the health and well-being of the community.”

The School of Nursing offers both traditional and accelerated second degree BSN programs for those who do not already hold a Registered Nurse (RN) license. Students in the accelerated second degree program either hold a previous non-nursing bachelor’s degree or they are veterans with significant healthcare work experience in the military.  After completing one of these programs, students become eligible to take the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX).

“Both of these programs are in high demand, with more than 350 pre-nursing majors seeking admission to one of the coveted seats in these programs,” commented Megan Keiser, Interim Director of Undergraduate Nursing Affairs.

“We always have more qualified student applicants than seats available,” said Keiser. “This is an effort to increase the number of licensed registered nurses who will be available after graduation for employment in Genesee County and the surrounding region.”

The School of Nursing, along with the University, continues to recruit a diverse student and faculty population.

“This expansion will attract additional students, faculty, and staff who will work and live in the local community and contribute to the local economy,” said Andrews.

UM-Flint nursing students consistently volunteer at area health screenings, health fairs, food banks, lead screenings, water distribution sites in Flint, other community events, as well as internationally.

“Our students are incredibly generous with their time, and this program expansion will increase the number of nursing students available to respond to the needs of our community,” said Keiser.

Robert is a staff writer in the Office of University Relations. Contact him with comments, questions, and story ideas.